Tree Services - Tyler, Texas - Artmire Urban Forestry
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Tree Services - Tyler, Texas - Artmire Urban Forestry
Tree Service Provided by Artmire:
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Planting For Posterity: Hundreds Of Baby Trees Take Root In Tyler  -  By JACQUE HILBURN-SIMMONS  -  Staff Writer
Overcast skies, mild temperatures and a heaping helping of humidity provided near perfect conditions Tuesday as hundreds of baby trees settled into new homes in Tyler.

Nestled under the protective canopies of mature trees in Faulk-ner Park, the tiny newcomers are expected to one day add a brilliant burst of spring color to the urban forest.

A soft, springlike breeze added the "ahhhhhhh" moment to planting activities, offered in support of Mayor Barbara Bass' Tree Tyler Initiative.

"We have very optimum planting conditions," Eric Artmire, certified arborist said. "It's not cold; it's not hot. Now is the perfect time for planting, while they (trees) are dormant and it's cool."

His company, Artmire's Urban Forestry, is donating 5,000 shade-loving seedlings over the next five years -- dogwoods, eastern redbuds and American beautyberries -- to help fulfill the mayor's goal of planting 5,000 trees within the next five years.

He's also providing a work plan and special soil amendments to create an unprecedented, future splash of color to city-owned properties and corridors.

"In the areas where we're planting, you couldn't ask for better soil," Artmire said. "It has sat undisturbed for years and years and years. It's filled with organic matter."

Eric Artmire’s company, Urban Forestry, is donating 5,000 shade-loving seedlings over the next five years.
The rich, amended soil should provide ample nourishment for the young trees, serving eventually as a complement to Tyler's Azalea and Spring Flower Trails, he said.

"It will be as pretty as anyone has ever seen," he said.

Artmire's donation follows a commitment from LT24, a group of business and civic leaders, to organize Tree Tyler Day, a communitywide tree planning event March 19.

Private support for the mayor's green-up plan also is blossoming -- almost 400 trees have been planted by individual residents in recent weeks.

The mayor hopes more people will grab a shovel and help out.

"With this new donation, our annual count will reach 1,400 trees," Mayor Barbara Bass said. "Along with our partnership with LT24 and the upcoming Tree Tyler Day, I have no doubt that we will reach our goal well ahead of schedule."

Although Artmire's donation meets the mayor's goal of 5,000 trees, the need still exists for native sun-loving varieties, such as oaks and pecans. This is where LT24 and Tyler Tree Day come into play.

Sponsors, as of Tuesday, included Leo Mack Jr., Adams Engineering, Native Plant So-ciety, Tyler Men's Garden Club, Salon Verve and Bob Shelton family.

"This is a good way to support Tyler," said Maegan Schneider, an LT24 member who works as project manager for Adams Engineering. "We support Mayor Bass's initiative. This is a way to get our hands dirty and help support the program. I like to garden. I'm forcing the guys to get outside and be involved."

Ms. Schneider, who has dabbled in dirt since college, is leading the charge to encourage other engineering firms to join in and help support the mayor.

The admitted green thumb described her efforts as promoting a little "healthy competition" among friends.

Lee Trammel, another LT24 member, agreed.

"This is a great program for the community," said Trammel, marketing director for Feliciano Financial Group. "It helps the beautification of our city, and helps us stay green."

Trammel said his interest in the outdoors is rooted from childhood.

"We always had a garden," he said. "We had vegetables and fruit. We also planted 100 trees on our land, oaks and pines. Unfortunately they didn't all survive. I was a little careless with the lawnmower."

LT24 member Brian Pearson,

Tyler Morning Telegraph managing editor, said Tyler Tree Day has landed verbal sponsorship commitments from about a dozen companies.

"Some of the biggest businesses in this community are putting together their sponsorships for this terrific event," Pearson said. "But the beauty of it is that almost anyone can be a sponsor through the purchase of a single tree for $20, which allows individual families and Tyler school classrooms to get involved.

"I challenge every school and every classroom in Tyler to climb aboard this project."

Sponsors not only can donate money but also send out a team to plant the very trees they purchased. The city is working on event details.

Green thumbs are not required to participate in the March 19 event, organizers said.

Tree sites are preselected and irrigated. The city also will provide planting assistance.

Sponsorship levels and a list of trees suitable for the area can be found at www.treetyler.com.

The mayor's partnership with LT24 took root after she challenged members of Leadership Tyler 24 class to get on board with the tree initiative.

Class members weighed the possibilities and ultimately formed LT24 to serve as a community service group operating outside the program.

Sponsorship opportunities range from a single tree to larger donations, allowing everyone from schoolchildren to the largest business an opportunity to participate, LT24 members said.

Supporters at the $20 "sap-ling" level receive one tree; $100 "acorn" level, five trees; $500 "redbud" level, 20 trees; $1,500 "dogwood" level, 50 trees; and $2,500 "live oak" level, 100 trees. All sponsors, except those at the sapling level, receive a logo on the event T-shirt, recognition on press releases and a logo on the Tree Tyler website.

Live oak sponsors are recognized also on the event banner, in advertisements, press releases and future printings of Tree Tyler brochure.

The Tree Tyler Initiative echoes a commitment made more than 20 years ago by the TREES Committee, to reforest city parks and public spaces and educate the community about the benefits.

Residents responding to the call for public input on Tyler 21 in 2006 said protecting the city's trees should be a top priority for the long-range development plan.

The mayor's 2015 Tree Tyler Initiative was launched in April, the same day the city was named an official member of Tree City USA, sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

Earlier sponsors include TXU, Wright Tree Farm, Keep Tyler Beautiful, Smith County Extension Services, East Texas Medical Center, Tyler Junior College, Texas Forest Service and The University of Texas at Tyler.
 
City receives donation of 1,000 trees  -  Planting to begin this week
As part of the Mayor’s Tree Initiative, Artmire’s Urban Forestry has donated 1,000 trees per year for the next five years to be planted at select locations in Faulkner Park, Rose Rudman Trail and Creekside Trail. The project includes all seedlings, amendments and labor for the plantings of Dogwoods, Eastern Redbud and American Beauty Berry. Planting is expected to commence today.

“We are so thankful to Artmire’s for their generous donation,” commented Mayor Barbara Bass. “This is a huge step forward in our effort to plant trees throughout the City and to keep Tyler’s urban forest thriving.”

The Mayor’s Tree Tyler initiative was launched in early 2010 with a goal to plant 5,000 trees in five years. Residents are encouraged to register their tree plantings on the Tree Tyler web page www.TreeTyler.com. Since the launch of the program, nearly 400 trees have been registered.

“With this new donation, our annual count will reach 1,400 trees,” added Mayor Bass. “Along with our partnership with LT24 and the upcoming Tree Tyler Day, I have no doubt that we will reach our goal well ahead of schedule.”

The City is partnering with LT 24 to hold Tree Tyler Day on March 19, 2011. Tree Tyler Day will give the community the opportunity to come together to work toward reaching the Mayor’s goal of planting 5,000 trees in five years at an inaugural communitywide tree planting event.

The partnership sprouted when Mayor Bass spoke with members of the Leadership Tyler 24 class and challenged them to get on board to support the Tree Tyler Initiative. Many members of the class met several times to discuss how they could become involved and ultimately formed LT24.

Between now and the March event, LT 24 will be seeking sponsors for the tree planting event. With sponsorship opportunities ranging from a single tree all the way to 100 trees, the entire community, from school classes to the City’s largest businesses, is encouraged to participate. A flyer detailing Tree Tyler Day sponsorship opportunities is available online at www.TreeTyler.com or on the City of Tyler web page at www.cityoftyler.org.

Sponsors who have already committed to the event include: Leo Mack Jr., Adams Engineering, the Native Plant Society, Tyler Men’s Garden Club, Salon Verve and the Bob Shelton Family.

To sign up as a Tree Tyler Day sponsor, please contact the Tyler Parks and Recreation Department at (903) 531-1370.
 
 
1,000 Trees Donated For Mayor's Initiative   By JACQUE HILBURN-SIMMONS  -  Staff Writer - Tyler Morning Telegraph
  Breath-taking landscapes start as twigs.

  That's the philosophy of certified arborist Eric Artmire, who is stepping up to help fulfill Mayor Barbara Bass's Tree Tyler Initiative of planting 5,000 new trees within the next five years.

  His company, Artmire's Urban Forestry, is donating 5,000 seedlings over the next five years -- dogwoods, eastern redbuds and American beautyberries.

  As part of his donation, Artmire also will provide a work plan, special soil amendments and labor to create a pop of brilliant spring color to the city-owned properties and corridors.

  "This is not something that will happen overnight," Artmire said. "Once (the seedlings) are rooted and acclimated to the area, they will do better than a larger tree."

  He predicts the random plantings, staggered over the next five years, will create incredible beauty when they reach maturity.

  Artmire said the flowering varieties he's donating are "under story," meaning they grow in the shade of mature trees. Weather permitting, planting could start next week, he said.

  "It will tickle me to death for people visiting the Azalea Trails to want to go look at the azaleas and dogwoods in our parks," Artmire said. "It will be one heck of an impact planting. It will be as pretty as anyone has ever seen."

  Mayor Bass expressed appreciation for the twiggy treasures.

  "These donations are an amazing start to the Tree Tyler Initiative," she said. "The spirit of community support they are demonstrating is an incredible benefit to our efforts to grow our urban forest, and I can't thank them enough. Hopefully, this will inspire other local businesses to jump in and commit to sponsoring and planting trees on Tree Tyler Day."

  Artmire's donation comes on the heels of a commitment voiced from LT24 to designate March 19 as Tree Tyler Day, a communitywide tree-planting event.

  Group members, who come from business and civic organizations, said they are determined to help the mayor invigorate the city's urban forest so future generations can enjoy the area's natural beauty.

  Although Artmire's donation meets the mayor's goal of 5,000 trees, the need still exists for native, sun-loving varieties, such as oaks and pecans, the kind of trees that will be part of the March 19 communitywide tree-planting event, city leaders said.

  The idea to partner with the mayor sprouted when Mayor Bass challenged members of Leadership Tyler 24 class to get on board with the tree initiative.

  Class members met several times afterward to examine the possibilities, ultimately creating LT24, a community service group operating outside the program, to make things happen."I think it's crucial" to get involved, said David Apperley, LT24 class member and American State Bank employee. "We know we won't see the effects for probably 10, 15, 20 years down the line."

  He predicted Tree Tyler Day to be the first of many opportunities to green up the city.

  Apperley said he plans active participation in the mayor's initiative, emphasizing that he's not scared of shovels, blisters or dirt under the fingernails.

  "I was taught as a kid that builds character," he said.

  LT24 is seeking sponsors for the tree-planting event, which offers opportunities ranging from a single tree for $20 to donations of 100 or even more. LT24 is contacting many entities including businesses and the Tyler Independent School District.

  Sponsorship levels start at a single tree and grow higher. Trees will be planted on city-owned properties and parks or roadway corridors.

  Options for support include choosing the "sapling" level for $20 receive one tree; "acorn," $100, five trees; "redbud," $500, 20 trees; "dogwood," $1,500, 50 trees; and "live oak," $2,500, 100 trees.

  All sponsors, except for those at the sapling level, receive a logo on event T-shirt, recognition on press releases and a logo on Tree Tyler Web site.

  Live oak sponsors also receive a logo on the event banner and recognition in advertisements, press releases and future printings of Tree Tyler brochure.

  Community interest in Tree Tyler Day already is starting to blossom.

  "I've been getting calls," said Susan Guthrie, city spokeswoman. "We're getting a lot of interest in this project."

  For example, the Tyler Garden Club has committed to 40 trees, she said.

  City leaders said participation is welcome from all ages and abilities.

  The mayor admitted with a chuckle she doesn't have a green thumb, but said gardening expertise is not a requirement for participation.

  "I went to the tree planting in November," she said. "They had someone out there to show us how it's done."

  It's not difficult to master the technique, the mayor said.

  "All you need is a good shovel to dig with and a pair of gloves to wear so you won't get blisters," she said.

  Planting sites for the March 19 event are pre-selected and irrigated.

  For those who need guidance with tree selection, a list of trees suitable for the area can be found at www.treetyler.com. Planting assistance also is available.

  Some of the more common varieties include crape myrtles, maples, pecans, oaks and Southern Magnolias.

  Artmire plans to plant roughly 1,100 seedlings each winter for the next five years. Trees range in height from 5 to 16 inches.

  Redbuds generally produce bright pink flowers; dogwoods, white. The American beautyberries produce life-sustaining food for wildlife.

  Artmire said he works a lot with the city's parks department and appreciates the staff's care of the natural resources within the community.

  Giving back is appropriate, he said, adding, "It's time for me to do something nice."

  The Tree Tyler Initiative echoes a commitment made more than 20 years ago by the TREES Committee, to reforest city parks and public spaces and educate the community about its green resources.

  Residents responding to the call for public input on Tyler 21 in 2006 said protecting the city's trees should be a top priority for the long-range development plan.

  The mayor's 2015 Tree Tyler Initiative was launched in April, the same day the city was designated as one of 3,400 official members of Tree City USA, sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

  TXU, another corporate sponsor, responded to the initiative by donating 105 trees, becoming the first corporate sponsor of the mayor's tree project.

  Wright Tree Farm in Edom also donated more than 250 trees, several of them hardwoods, to encourage and celebrate green living, city leaders said.

  Other sponsors include Keep Tyler Beautiful, Smith County Extension Services, East Texas Medical Center, Tyler Junior College, Texas Forest Service and The University of Texas at Tyler.
 
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What Our Clients Are Saying About Artmire's

Thanks for the great job done at the ranch! Your crew did a phenomenal job clearing brush from the lake dam and cleaning up dead fall. They also rescued several large trees with their accurate pruning. The mulch created has been used widely in many places out here.
BTW the pine seedlings you planted two years ago are over head tall and providing the much needed wind break/privacy screen.
Kudos, and thank you for your continued excellent work!

S. Holder  -  Tyler, TX

 
 
 
 
 
Tree Services - Tyler, Texas - Artmire Urban Forestry

Artmire's Urban Forestry, Tree Service, Tyler, TX

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